The Castles of Scotland by Martin Coventry | Goblinshead | A comprehensive guide to 4,100 castles, towers, historic houses, stately homes and family lands
The Castles of Scotland by Martin Coventry | Goblinshead | A comprehensive guide to 4,100 castles, towers, historic houses, stately homes and family lands
The ‘Bible of Scottish Castles’…now available!
The ‘Bible of Scottish Castles’…now available! 

Dryden

Lothians: About 1.5 miles south-west of Loanhead, on minor roads and foot east of B7006, 1 mile north of Roslin village, at Dryden.


Site of tower or old house. This was replaced by Dryden House, which was a symmetrical mansion of three storeys with advanced wings and an off-centre pillared porch, but this was demolished in 1938.
  Dryden Tower [NT 270646] stands in a prominent position in the former policies of the house, and is a tall gothic-style tower, datng from the middle of the 19th century.
  ‘Dryden’ is marked on Blaeu’s map of The Lothians, then ‘Drydune’ on Adair’s map of Midlothian, where the building is shown in enclosed and wooded policies.
  The property was probably held by the Dryden family, but then by the Sinclairs in the 15th century, and Sir John Sinclair of Dryden, dubbed the Queen’s Knight by the poet William Dunbar, was killed at the Battle of Flodden in 1513. They held the property until the end of the 16th century. Sir Patrick Murray of Dryden is on record in the 17th century, but by 1686 had gone to the Lockharts when Sir George Lockhart of Dryden is mentioned. The held the estate until 1837 or later, but by the middle of the 19th century the property had been sold to the Trotters. As mentioned above the house was demolished in 1938 and much of the policies were swallowed up in the former Bilston Glen colliery.

Search also from Menu Bar

(sites, places, clans, names, films, dates)

GOBLINSHEAD ONLINE SHOP

(coming soon…)

Contact

Goblinshead

Cockenzie House
22 Edinburgh Road
Cockenzie

EH32 0HY

 

Email: info@thecastlesofscotland.co.uk

 

Or use our contact form.

Print Print | Sitemap
© Martin Coventry