The Castles of Scotland by Martin Coventry | Goblinshead | A comprehensive guide to 4,100 castles, towers, historic houses, stately homes and family lands
The Castles of Scotland by Martin Coventry | Goblinshead | A comprehensive guide to 4,100 castles, towers, historic houses, stately homes and family lands
The ‘Bible of Scottish Castles’…now available!
The ‘Bible of Scottish Castles’…now available! 

Struthers Castle

Fife: About 4 miles south of Cupar, on minor road west of the A916, 1 mile south of Craigrothie, at Struthers.

 

Ruin or site   NO 377097   OS: 59   KY15 5PG


Struthers Castle is a ruined 16th-century L-plan tower house of four storeys, which probably incorporates earlier work, but was much altered in the 18th century with the insertion of large windows. The castle had a substantial park of some 200 acres, enclosed by a stone wall. The building was in ruins before 1840, and the ‘gardens, great orchards and vast enclosures and plantations’ have gone. A 17th-century doocot [NO 377097] is also ruinous.
  ‘Strudder’ is marked on Blaeu’s Atlas of Fife.
  This was originally a property of the Keiths, but was exchanged for Dunnottar in 1392. Struthers became the main stronghold of the Lindsays of The Byres, Lords Struthers, who later succeeded to the Earldom of Crawford. Mary, Queen of Scots, visited Struthers in 1565.

  In 1606 John Lindsay, Lord Lindsay of the Byres, had a ratification in his favour, which mentions the lands of Auchterutherstruther, with the castle, tower, fortalice manor place etc. John Lindsay, Earl of Crawford, was confined in Struthers in 1649 on a penalty of 10,000 merks if he did anything to disturb the peace of the kingdom.
  Charles II stayed at the castle in 1651, and it was occupied by Cromwell’s forces in 1653. The Lindsays held the property until the 19th century, but by 1840 it had gone to the Boyle Earls of Glasgow.

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