The Castles of Scotland by Martin Coventry | Goblinshead | A comprehensive guide to 4,100 castles, towers, historic houses, stately homes and family lands
The Castles of Scotland by Martin Coventry | Goblinshead | A comprehensive guide to 4,100 castles, towers, historic houses, stately homes and family lands
The ‘Bible of Scottish Castles’…now available!
The ‘Bible of Scottish Castles’…now available! 

Lochindorb Castle

South Highland: About 6.5 miles north-west of Grantown-on-Spey, on minor road and boat west of A939, north-east of Lochindorb Lodge, on island in Lochindorb.

 

Ruin or site   NH 974364   OS: 27   PH26 3PY

 

OPEN: View from exterior (from shore of loch).

Lochindorb Castle, a scenic old ruinous castle on an island in the loch, associated with the Wolf of Badenoch, near Grantown on Spey in the Highlands of Scotland. Lochindorb Castle (print 1936)

Meaning the ‘loch of trouble’ in Gaelic, Lochindorb Castle is a ruined 13th-century stronghold of enclosure with round corner towers, occupying all the island. There are traces of a hall block, chapel and other buildings within the courtyard.

Plan of Lochindorb Castle, a scenic old ruinous castle on an island in the loch, associated with the Wolf of Badenoch, near Grantown on Spey in the Highlands of Scotland. Lochindorb Castle: plan (MacGibbon and Ross)

This was a property of the Comyns. The castle was occupied by the English during the Wars of Independence, and Edward I of England visited in 1303. It was held again for the English in 1335 when Andrew Moray the Regent besieged it unsuccessfully, and had to withdraw before a large army led by Edward III.
  ‘Ylen L. Duyrb’ is marked on Pont’s map of Moray and Nairn.

Lochindorb Castle, a scenic old ruinous castle on an island in the loch, associated with the Wolf of Badenoch, near Grantown on Spey in the Highlands of Scotland. Lochindorb Castle (MacGibbon and Ross)

The castle was then used as a prison. At the end of the 14th century, it was a property of Alexander Stewart, the Wolf of Badenoch. Lochindorb passed to the Douglas Earls of Moray, who strengthened it against James II, but was dismantled after their fall in 1455, and not reused. The castle is mentioned in the process of forfeiture against the Black Douglases, including Archibald ‘pretended Earl of Moray’. The iron yett was taken to Cawdor Castle. Substantial remains survived at the end of the 18th century.
  The property passed to the Stewart Earls of Moray, then was sold to the Campbells of Cawdor in 1606, who sold it to the Ogilvie Earl of Seafield in 1750.
  During investigation of the castle and island five granite balls were found, which had probably been cast here by a trebuchet during a siege.

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